Danger and Opportunity in the Esther Narrative

I talk about research and why I switched from the 3rd to the 1st person: “It’s nice to leave a character a lot of room for growth at the beginning of a novel, but not if she ends up turning off readers.”

Danger and Opportunity in the Esther Narrative full article in Lilith

Esther

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The Jewish Daily Forward gave me the opportunity to write about something more important now than ever

In our current social media and political climates, particularly the rise of Donald J. Trump, a woman’s looks are fair game whenever she’s mentioned. It’s more important now than ever to tell stories of women that emphasize intelligence and courage rather than beauty. Thanks to The Jewish Daily Forward for letting me write about something so close to my heart.

Esther

Is Esther a True Heroine? My first post for The Jewish Book Council.

The book of Esther tells the story of a Jewish girl who becomes queen of Persia and thwarts the genocide of her people. Though it’s read aloud in synagogue each year, the reading is accompanied by so much raucous celebration that I never paid close attention to the details. I listened for Esther’s and her cousin Mordechai’s names so I could cheer, and I listened for the evil Haman’s name so I could shake my noisemaker and boo. The costumes, treats, drunkenness—the experience of the Purim holiday celebration—distracted me from the intricacies of the story.

I thought the story was a simple one: a beautiful Jewish girl wins the king and saves her people with the encouragement of her cousin. I couldn’t understand why it took so long to read. Each year, about a quarter of the way through the reading, my thoughts had already sped ahead to hamentashen, wine and dancing.

To see what was delaying the final phase of the party, I started to read along. Later, I read it again on my own. I was confused. Esther didn’t seem like a true heroine. She seemed to be an indecisive girl who would have allowed the genocide of her people if not for Mordeachai’s harsh prodding. Beauty and obedience are the only assets mentioned. In fact, the king’s choice of Esther from among all the virgins is summed up, “The king loved Esther more than all the other women, and she won his grace and favor more than all the virgins,” leaving us to look for the description of her up to this point that may have made her attractive to him. The most telling description of her seems to be that she was “shapely and beautiful.” Beyond that, we have only her deference to the wisdom of Hegai, “She did not ask for anything but what Hegai, the king’s eunuch and guardian of the women, advised. Yet Esther won the admiration of all who saw her…” and her deference to Moredechai, “But Esther still did not reveal her kindred or her people, as Mordecai had instructed her; for Esther obeyed Mordecai’s bidding, as she had done when she was under his tutelage.”

When she finally does disobey a man, it’s not due to a new strength and independence. It’s due to cowardice. Mordecai instructs her to go to the king to reveal that she’s a Jew and ask for her people’s lives. She responds that going before the king without being invited is an offense that is punishable by death. Mordechai, upon learning that saving her people is not enough of a reward for risking her life, tells her, “Do not imagine that you, or all the Jews, will escape with your life… if you keep silent… you and your father’s house will perish.” It is only then that she decides that she will go to the king, and issues the most famous quote from the story, “…if I am to perish, I shall perish!”

What sort of heroine is Esther?

To answer this question, I dove more deeply into the story. What I discovered was that on the face of them, a number of Esther’s choices don’t make sense. Beneath the surface, however, is an Esther who is strategic and cunning.

Stay tuned for my next post, in which we’ll dig deeper into what I believe is Esther’s true role in the story: that of an intelligent and courageous girl who learned to think for herself.

The Full Jewish Book Council Post

A 5 star review that uses one of my favorite words to describe my book. Fabulous!

“This is a wonderfully written, well researched book. Kanner’s descriptions and writing style will leave the reader breathless and wanting more. This is a work of fiction, but I feel as if I actually know Esther the person.

I highly recommend ESTHER, This is a fabulous book.” 5/5 stars.

http://bookloversparadise.blogspot.com/2015/09/esther-by-rebecca-kanner.html

Esther by Rebecca Kanner

My day = made.

ADDLibrarian

Okay, so I know I said I was done with Esther, but I’m changing my tune because Rebecca Kanner totally grabbed my attention with her new novel Esther which comes out in November. I was intrigued by Kanner’s previous book about Noah’s wife, Sinners and the Sea, but I never got around to reading it. I guess I’ve got to go find it now!

esther-cover-423x640
For Esther, becoming queen is a matter of life and death. The king’s harem is a dangerous place and only the favored or the very ruthless survive. To ensure her survival, Esther sets her sights on being queen and embarks on a quest to get there no matter what the cost. She finds help and allies in unexpected places and gradually comes to accept that sacrifices must be made, sometimes by her, and sometimes on her behalf by those she comes to love to secure her place as…

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